Slice of September 2017

Before I get too into this, I want to remind peoples of my year-end survey. 😀 I want to balance my special interest posts more and include some new kinds of posts. 💖
Photo of sunflower with text in white: Slice of September 2017

Just before writing this, I was:

Putting this off because uploading photos is a pain in the ass.

This past month:

With Grandmama’s help, I purchased a new laptop. It’s an old model, but not as dated as I was seeing for a while—and it should tide me over for now, or at least better than if I hadn’t one at all. I spent a lot of time reading over reviews for it with a careful eye. While, yes—millennials1 can live without electronics—the world has adapted so much that living without them is not a wise option. I need a laptop so I can write and create things, and I’m not the sort of person who can tolerate any sensory environment when I do such. Anyone who says such things—that one needs to “go outside” or “live life” should get off their own electronics for an equally long duration; put your money where your mouth is or don’t talk at all. 👌

I do feel I’ve learned quite a lot over the last year without one, though, and I hope to use such wisdom in my life moving forward. It’s allowed me to learn better productivity methods and to stop thinking so technically in my writing. The most important thing in the early drafting stage is to get the idea down. Typing was easy because I’m fast, but my carpal tunnel syndrome makes handwriting harder, so I haven’t time to be a perfectionist if I want to get an idea down before it dissipates.

I also got in touch with reading, and I learned how to pass idle time in a way that doesn’t include creating my exes in Sims form and killing them off after my Sim self breaks their hearts. This isn’t to say, of course, that free time should always be spent productively—I’ve come to find the current trend in the world is to be productive as hell, regardless of whatever overwhelm it creates—because we need to give our brain a break and stop being so serious sometimes, lest we forget how to have fun and exchange our sense of humor for “growing up”.

This past month, I learned:

  • How to do sponsored content better
    • This sounds so weird, but I’m excited because it sounds super fun.
      • I also know how to answer requests from companies to do a plethora of things. I have newfound confidence and can’t wait to use it.~
  • I need to discipline myself again. I fell out of it because of stress and overwhelm.

This past month, I grew bored of:

My life.

I also grew bored of using Roboto for my Visual Editor font, so I switched it to Karla, and life is a lil’ less “blah AF” in terms of writing up in this joint.

But that’s OK, ’cause I enjoyed:

Today, something that made me happy:

I realized I’m not in as much pain as I have been since helping Charlise with towels on Tuesday. I can walk without feeling my bones interact with each other.

Photo of some of the towels I did late this month to help Charlise with a laundry order of 840
Photo of some of the towels I did late this month to help Charlise with a laundry order of 840. I accomplished many “snails” Tuesday. ‘Tis grainy because it’s phone photography and has been through Instagram, and my phone failed to save the orig. #slacker

Tomorrow, I’m going to:

Clean up my room a bit, because I let it go because I was in too much pain to bend my knees.

In October, I’m going to make the positive change of:

I don’t even know right now…trying not to stay up so late?

One thing on my to-do list:

I need to finish two books ASAP. 😫

One pleasant photo from this past month:

Candid photo of my cousin Solara and I at our cousin's baby shower
Candid photo of Solara (cousin) and I at our cousin’s baby shower. I look crappy because I put my hair up (it was hot), but she looks greaat.

After this post, I will:

Finish reading The Day the Angels Fell.


As a note, these prompts come from Georgie’s monthly review posts. I started doing them…last year? Idunno. Time isn’t so innate for me. I credited her the first time, then assumed it would be common knowledge that people would know. 😉 I am probz going to be switching it up to something else later on because I really enjoy lists.

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  1. A Nielson social media study shows it is older generations who have a harder time “living without” electronics such as cell phones, personal computers, and satellite/cable television.

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Comments on this post

Jamie’s gravatar

Yay for the new laptop! I find disconnecting for a while sometimes can be really nice to de-stress, though not having web access in this day and age can be a bit difficult. Internet access helps immensely in streamlining things and is one of the major ways I can keep in touch with friends or getting work. >_< While I hadn’t disconnected totally, I had been taking a step back from my computer time and gaming and I think it’s helped me with my depression and stress. Granted the blogging read/reviewing thing has come with it’s own pressures that I’m trying to dial back from and get back to reading for myself.

Hopefully the two books you’re trying to finish are good and it goes smoothly! Also super cute picture, the baby looks so cute with that headband!!

Jamie’s gravatar

I’m just curious as to where you got your stats from about the older generation can’t live without their technology? Where I live I have seen many millenials on their phones and such, especially in college. And I hardly ever see anyone my age using their phones or laptops for pleasure. It’s usually for homework purposes or to pass the time away. I don’t care what generation can’t live without their phones or what have you, I believe if you have one, you are going to use it to kill time. There are people out there with stronger mind sets that don’t need to be on the computer 24/7.

Jamie’s gravatar

Just a note, I’m not attacking you, just curious.

Liz’s gravatar

I meant to link it and forgot; I wrote that at the beginning of the month, as I always start these things at the beginning of the month.

Links have been added, but more information is as followed:

I researched this topic for a future post, and what I came down to is that the people who grew up around the technology, with regular access to it, are less likely to become addicted. It’s similar to alcohol and children who grew up around [being used in a healthy manner]: the children are less likely to experiment in unhealthy ways and take the path to Addiction Rd. than those who grew up never seeing it in their house and/or their guardians not using it responsibly.

It’s not necessarily the mind needing to be on the computer 24/7—and it’s not a bad thing if they do, I don’t think; the technological world is evolving so much that we are, for better for worse, becoming more and more dependent on our devices. It doesn’t make someone bad because they spend so much time on one or the other; it’s a matter of lifestyle. “Pleasure” vs. work doesn’t matter anymore, either; the divide is irrelevant in today’s technological society, because 1) more people are workaholics, and 2) technology allows us to work around the clock, which isn’t always productive or something we realize—the problem is when we rely on these things in ways that cut into our offline, device-free lives…and technology surrounds us.

Moreover, it doesn’t matter what we see around us as much as what is there in reality, because when we’re so focused on what we see, we miss the things that are truly there—our perceptions are based on our experiences; and unless we train our minds to be more opening and questioning of everything, we’ll only ever see what we perceive—and what we perceive is not always fact, but more often what our minds have been raised to believe is true. However, after reading these studies, you may start to notice how true they are—that’s the Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon. So, with pleasure becoming work and work becoming pleasure, look with new eyes and a freshened mind at your environment and how many people are using their devices for whatever reason.